News Roundup

pepper spray

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Lawyer expresses regret after he is pepper-sprayed by mayor

A lawyer who was pepper-sprayed by the mayor of Portland, Oregon, has expressed regret for the incident that provoked the response. Mayor Ted Wheeler had pepper-sprayed Cary Cadonau after the lawyer confronted the mayor in a restaurant parking lot and accused him of failing to practice social distancing while dining outdoors with a companion. The mayor told police that Cadonau wasn’t wearing a mask when he got within a foot or two of him, and he feared for his safety. Cadonau said he is “remorseful for my decision to confront Mayor Wheeler,” and he is sorry that the mayor felt the need to use pepper spray. Cadonau also apologized to his law partners at Brownstein Rask. Wheeler said he appreciated the apology, and he considers the matter closed. (Law360, the Oregonian)

Ex-FBI lawyer sentenced for altering email

Former FBI lawyer Kevin Clinesmith has been sentenced to a year of probation for altering an email used to justify surveillance of former Trump campaign adviser Carter Page. When imposing the sentence, U.S. District Judge James Boasberg of the District of Columbia said he thought Clinesmith changed the email as an “inappropriate shortcut.” Clinesmith will also have to serve 400 hours of community service. Prosecutors had suggested a sentence of up to six months in prison. (Law.com, the Washington Post)

Probation officer settles harassment suit against judge

Judge Thomas Doerr of Butler County, Pennsylvania, has settled a lawsuit contending that he coerced a probation officer to have sexual relations. Terms of the settlement weren’t disclosed. The 3rd U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals at Philadelphia had ruled last year that Doerr wasn’t protected by qualified immunity. (Law360)

Court allows ouster of judge accused of harassment

The California Supreme Court on Wednesday refused to interfere with the ouster of an appeals judge accused of sexual harassment and unwanted touching. The court denied review in the case of Jeffrey Johnson, who was ordered removed from the bench last year by the California Commission on Judicial Performance. (Law.com, the San Francisco Chronicle)