News Roundup

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Lawyers favor Biden campaign in individual donations

Presidential campaign donations by individual lawyers heavily favor Joe Biden, according to a Reuters analysis. Individual lawyers gave $29 million to Biden’s campaign and just under $1.75 million to the re-election campaign of President Donald Trump. The Biden predilection includes lawyers at Jones Day—which has earned millions of dollars as outside counsel to Trump’s re-election campaign. Lawyers at Jones Day have donated nearly $90,000 to the Biden presidential campaign but only $50 to the Trump campaign. (Reuters)

New York City joins suit over ‘anarchist’ label

New York City has joined the cities of Seattle and Portland, Oregon, in a lawsuit that challenges their “anarchist” label by President Donald Trump. The suit challenges Trump’s declared plans to withhold federal money from the cities. (The New York Times, NPR, the lawsuit)

Jenner & Block commits to $250M in pro bono work

Jenner & Block has pledged to provide $250 million in free legal services over the next five years to those who need access to justice. The annual total of $50 million a year is more than 10% of the firm’s annual gross revenue. “We’re doubling down on our commitment by setting clear, definable metrics,” co-managing partner Randy Mehrberg told Law.com. “This is our way of raising the bar.” (Law.com, Law360)

Law firm and in-house leaders asked to make diversity pledges

The Leadership Council on Legal Diversity is asking its more than 300 members to make public diversity pledges. The council’s members include leaders of law firms and in-house legal departments. Most of the pledges so far involve commitments to sponsor or mentor diverse lawyers. The initiative is called “Leaders at the Front.” (Law.com, Bloomberg Law)

Reed Smith, Loeb & Loeb restore pay

Reed Smith and Loeb & Loeb have restored pay that had been cut during the COVID-19 pandemic. Both law firms had already partly restored salaries. Loeb & Loeb plans to restore salaries fully retroactive to Oct. 1, while Reed Smith will restore full salaries on Nov. 1. (Above the Law here and here, Bloomberg Law, Law360)